Coronavirus, featured, op-ed, Speak Wonder, Welcome to the Shivoo

Primal Scream Therapy

By Breath of Joy author, Kathy Joy

According to CNN, “A theme park in Fujiyoshida, Japan, is banning screaming on its roller coasters to prevent the spread of Covid-19 and instead is urging customers to “scream in their hearts.”

The reasoning behind this is because research indicates droplets are released during screaming.

They have also launched a social media campaign called “Keep a Serious Face” to try to get people to play along. So I guess a lot of this is tongue-in-cheek humor — literally.

Not sure how you would handle this new rule, but I’m 100% sure I could not ride a roller coaster and not scream. Imagine reading a sign like this at Waldameer:

WHILE RIDING THE RAVINE FLYER II, IT IS REQUIRED THAT YOU NOT SCREAM OUT LOUD. INSTEAD WE ASK THAT YOU SCREAM ONLY IN YOUR HEART. VIOLATORS WILL BE REMOVED FROM THE PARK IN THE INTEREST OF KEEPING OUR PATRONS SAFE FROM POTENTIALLY HAZARDOUS WATER DROPLETS.

Thank you, Japan, for the warnings.

Screaming is the human go-to in times of pure terror. I’m pretty sure that’s why God installed the screaming mechanism in the Body Human. I found through the Washington Post, the dynamics of being flung into hysteria by a roller coaster.

Why We Scream

  1. The G-force pulls your cheeks toward your ears and pushes you back in your seat; your face feels like it is sliding backward.
  2. Being upside down at a ridiculous acceleration…is scream-worthy.
  3. Your spleen is in your throat: As you crest a hill and the car starts to plummet, you feel as if your stomach and spleen might fly out of your seat.
  4. Coaster designers love to upend your innards.
  5. Fear + Adrenaline = SCREAMING OUT LOUD. (see more)

I was newly a widow when a close-knit cluster of friends insisted I go with them for a day of adventure.

a page from Breath of Joy: Simply Summer

Of course, I didn’t want to go. They had to drag me – and my attitude – to a scenic park where much-needed therapy awaited.

Among the many things that the group did for me that day, I think my favorite was the moment the car stopped at the edge of a thickly wooded area.

We got out of the car and the pack leader announced, “We are all going to scream. Scream as loud as you can! This is Primal Scream Therapy!”

I let out a primal scream; it erupted, lava and fury, from the depths of my stomach.
It wasn’t weird.

Surrounded by caring souls, I released my raggedy-edged grief into the generous arms of hemlocks and sugar maples, pines and oaks. The old-growth forest, called “Heart’s Content”, absorbed our combined screams and told no one.
In that moment, it was the safest place on earth.

Screams are for:
Death and delight
Anger and amazement
Warnings and homecomings
Plummeting down and rising back up, victorious and brave.

Aren’t you glad that here in the good old USA, you are not required to “scream in your heart” at amusement parks? Muffled, maybe by masks, but otherwise, we’re living!

We truly hope America keeps screaming on the way down. After all, it’s therapeutic.

Kathy Joy, Author of the Breath of Joy calendarial gift books


Subscribe here for more.

Leave your "two cents" here please!