Humor, Inbound and Outbound Marketing, literary, Tonya Jewel Blessing, Uncategorized

Ready to Woo

A Short Story by Tonya Jewel Blessing
Author of the Big Creek Appalachian Series
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In his younger days, some had called him handsome. Now, old age had set in. He was desperate. Clem knew he wouldn’t last the winter without a woman.

Oh, he was interested in loving, all right, if his health permitted, but, more importantly, he was interested in good food, lively conversation, and someone to help with the chores. If the gal played checkers and smoked a pipe, it was all the better. It’d been a while since clean overalls hung on his tall, lean frame. His shirts and socks also needed mending.

His bones were brittle from lack of nutrition and hard work; his feet misshapen from wearing boots too small; and most of his teeth were missing. The last tooth he’d pulled himself with some worn, rusted pliers borrowed from a friend. He had washed the pliers in moonshine, and, after the painful extraction, had rinsed his mouth repeatedly with the brew. He knew the art of gnawing food but was praying for a new pair in case his new wife was good at making vitals. 

He had just the gal in mind. Ruby Mae lived across the creek. Her husband had passed in the spring. It was rumored that Ruby’s mama had done him in with hemlock. He thought it might be so. Any woman, old or young, who wore a pan on her head must be crazy.

It had been a while since he went calling on a girl but had worked out his mind just what was needed. He had shot and killed three squirrels. The varmints were cleaned and hanging on a stick. He kept the pelts just in case the lady was of a mind to make him slippers. He also picked fall witch hazel flowers and tied them with twine. He knew that the flower helped with skin ailments of all types. When used topically it was fine but if ingested it could cause a person’s body to back up for several of days. He wanted the pan hatted lady to be aware of his knowledge about poison plants – just in case, she had any mischief in mind.

The creek water was running low. The fall rain showers had been brief and far between. Thunder and lightning aside, he enjoyed a good rain. His tin bathtub had a small hole, so he had taken to dancing in the rain with a small piece of soap made from lard. 

The worn-looking cabin was straight ahead. He could see the ladies sitting on the front porch hulling beans of some sort. He hoped it was black eye peas. They tasted mighty fine when seasoned with hog jowls

“Gals, it’s Clem from across the creek,” he called out a greeting. It wouldn’t do any good to frighten a lady, especially since he was calling with wife finding in mind.

The younger woman, Ruby Mae, stood to greet him. Martha, the older woman stayed seated in her rocker and scowled at him.

“Clem, it’s nice to be seein’ you.”

“Ruby Mae,” he nodded and awkwardly handed her the squirrel meat.

“Well, I’m thankful. Why don’t you join me and Mama for dinner? I’ll make us a fine supper.”

True to her word, the meal was delicious. The witch hazel flowers placed in a mason jar were centered on the table. Two candles made from bee comb sat on either side of the centerpiece.

“Ruby Mae, the meal was mighty fine.” Clem hemmed and hawed. “I’m needin’ me a woman, and I’m thinkin’ you’re the gal.”

Sweet Ruby Mae blushed, and Martha made a sound similar to a growl.

“Clem, I’m honored. My Homer done passed, and I’m gettin’ scared about the snow. I’m worried that Mama and me can’t manage the farm,” she looked down at the worn floorboards. “Is you thinkin’ of movin’ here or is me and Mama coming to your place.”

It hadn’t occurred to Clem to relocate across the creek, but the idea sat well with him. Ruby Mae’s home was pleasant, clean, and well kept. He spied jars of canned fruit, vegetables, and meat in the small room off the kitchen. 

“It’ll be fine to be moving here,” Clem answered. “But we’re needed to talk about Mama. I done heard that she killed Homer. If it’s true, I best be knowing before the preacher man is called.”

Ruby Mae looked toward her mother. “Mama…”

The older woman smiled a toothless grin. “I ain’t kilt nobody. There was a time or two that I was wantin’ to send Homer to his Maker, but I done feared for my eternal wellbein’. I won’t kill ya. I’m promisin’. I’ll be helping Martha to tend you. I’m knowing how to make food that you can gnaw and feed you gullet. I’ll even warsh your clothes.” 

“That’s mighty fine.” Clem replied.

The wedding took place the following week. Ruby Mae looked lovely in pale blue dress with a small pocket placed over her heart. The pocket was trimmed in lace. Her message was subtle, but Clem knew that his bride’s heart now belonged to him, and his heart belonged to her. Martha stood next to her daughter wearing the old pot for a hat. 

When the preacher told the newlyweds to kiss, Clem leaned in for a smooch. Before his lips touched Ruby Mae’s, he noticed a sprig of dried hemlock peeking from the lacy pocket. Ruby Mae winked and whispered in his ear, “And you thought it was Mama…”
 
The End
christonyablessing@gmail.com
www.tonyajewelblessing.com
Note: I found the picture above when I Googled Appalachian love stories. Because there was no story included, I decided to write my own.

To review books or personally interview any of the authors at Books For Bonding Hearts, please contact our publishing partner, Laura Bartnick @ lb.capturebooks@aol.com with your request.

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Humorous ring pillow

breath of joy, Inbound and Outbound Marketing, Kathy Joy, op-ed

Chocolates to Knives

Kathy Joy, Author of Winter Whispers

February 12, 2020

Some Dove chocolates have been lurking in my desk drawer at the office; I’ve been able, somehow, to resist them. But today is different. Today, as the calendar marches inevitably toward Valentine’s Day, my resolve is weak.

So today I’ve opened the little foil packaging and here’s what the inside message says:

“Believe in those you love.”

And just like that – a flood of memories leaked from my heart. Memories of my own sweetheart, Roger Hoffner, who died way too soon.

I believed in him.

And because I carry his memory like a treasure, I still believe in him – in the present tense.

Roger grew up in a time when boys admired men who wore leather gloves to work and tucked knives into their pockets to use when needed. He wanted to emulate them.

He was raised in a country swath of America that believed in ruggedness and self-sufficiency. He learned, by example, that you don’t toss something in the trash just because it quits working – you figure out how to fix it and you take the time to do it right.

He grew up in a time when bicycle skeletons were salvaged from junk yards; kids learned how to dismantle them and rebuild them to their own specifications: banana seat, high bars, squeeze horns and pedal brakes.

Living as a kid in the green rolling hills of Northwest Pennsylvania, Roger worked odd jobs for uncles in exchange for a hot meal and maybe a game of poker. He learned to drive tractor and toss hay bales into the mow, long before he was driving a car.

One of Roger’s most prized possessions was his pocket knife. I’ve kept it in my jewelry box.

That little 3-blade wonder came out when the girls got Barbie Dolls at Christmas time, the toys impossibly ensconced in those hard plastic packages.

The small but capable knife was used on our farm to:

  • cut twine,
  • fix a wooden latch,
  • remove a splinter,
  • break the ice on the horse’s buckets,
  • shorten a piece of tack when saddling up and once,
  • to remove gum from our oldest daughter’s hair.

I saw him:

  • slice a watermelon,
  • sharpen a pencil,
  • open a can, and
  • cut bait from the fishing line.

I often saw him cleaning his fingernails with the smallest blade.

Eventually, as his own nephews grew responsible enough, Roger started gifting little pocket knives to them so they’d be ready for any eventuality.

Each of our daughters also received a pocket knife when the time was right.

I fondly remember their papa cutting reeds by our pond with his knife, to fashion them into organic musical instruments for the girls. They held the long green leaves “just so” and blew through their thumbs and fingers to render nature’s finest music.

The sound came out something like chirping crickets mixed with bird warbling – it was simply beautiful.

The pocket knife, over the years, came to mean much more than simply a handy little tool. It represented a hearty resourcefulness. A hard-scrabble work ethic, a readiness for just about any situation.

I spoke with another guy who carries one, and he told me he’d attended a concert once and was horrified when the security guard confiscated the tool and tossed it carelessly into a garbage bin.

My friend fished his pocket knife out of the bin and left the venue; he was not going to lose a lifelong companion over a one-time event, so he went outside and people-watched while his wife enjoyed the music inside the arena.

That’s how strongly men of a former generation feel about their pocket knives, and that’s how strongly Roger felt about his, too.

I miss him.

Roger’s own pocket knife, a prized possession and heirloom.

I carry Roger’s memory in my heart. I will forward his legacy to my son-in-law. On his birthday coming up, I believe I will gift him Roger’s trusty pocket knife.

I wouldn’t want Nick to find himself in a situation and not be prepared. Especially when the day comes that he takes his own kids fishing and needs to cut some bait.

Author tools and hacks, Faith, Inbound and Outbound Marketing, ingenuity, Replete, Taxes, Money, Law

Being Author-preneurial When the Bottom Line is Wavy

When the Bottom Line is Wavy

Progressing with Your Protagonist


When the bottom line doesn’t add up to figures in black – without red dashes before them – what does a writer hope to gain by publishing a book?

Recently a new author sent me a list of questions to answer regarding her first month of publishing, which occurred at the end of last year. I’ve now been in the publishing business for five full years, which is practically nothing in the grand scheme of things.

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Why has anyone ever published their work? Has there ever been a financial guarantee?

I had to disclose the fact that the outlay of this author’s investment so far has been well beyond the income from book sales. Beyond that, what’s even more difficult to grasp is that the outlay of investment would continue as a calculated risk if she continued to buy advertising and publish other books. So, why does anyone choose to publish their own work? Historically, what did people hope to gain? Was there ever any financial guarantee?

Here are 10 gains to consider when you are deciding whether an author’s journey is worth taking.

Literary Growth

1. A watershed of education in literacy, in marketing, and in publicity occurs in the life of every rookie author (one to five years expected). People often see hybrid publishing as a way to work themselves into being offered a deal by a traditional publishing house.

Character Growth

2. The opportunity to persevere stakes out its garden-lit walkway.

Time to Let Down Your Hair for Recreation

3. Attending, or presenting to, a variety of writers conferences set in exquisite places will be a surprising boon and a blast of wind through the back door.

Find Like-Minded People

4. Bonding with other creatives whose values are similar to your own, or who answer your questions and needs, or those who need your knowledge enlarges your territory, i.e., editors, artists, philanthropist partners, agents, publicists, clubs, associations, and publishers whose goals intersect with yours and who bolster the vision and energy that you value so highly.

Expand Your Worldview

5.  Finding a wonderland  of science, legal research, human heart and worldviews in what you might now see as only a world of chill factors. Break the ice by learning to investigate and write the details well. Life begets life. Each new person or event you experience can be processed in your own life and writing style.

Become a Curious Child Again

6. Adult constraints are broken In physiological moments of creativity when an adult writer experiences the ripples of new connections among the four hemispheres of one’s brain. Inert reserve becomes child-like exploration of detail and there is energy to push through a writer’s problem. Both the process and the result will make your mouth water, your tears may fall, and your lungs will fill with a gasp of a-ha! Find these new avenues of ingenuity become your landmarks of personal life exploration.

Recognize Your God-given Voice by Using It

7. Telling your story your own way. By the grace of God you will use your voice and your God-given experience to reveal something meaningful to new audiences. This is the most personal journey of faith you embark on, to process your own life under the microscope and use parts of it to throw out like bread crumbs for others.

Jump Deep and Springboard off Editors and Critics

8. Use criticism as a springboard to improve your author’s voice, tone, technique, creativity, and insight. You’ll grow into your true value. legacy, and posterity.

Discover the Benefits of Silence and Solitude

9. Loving silence and solitude when a writer puts up four walls of personal boundaries to everything else in the world. No matter who or what is calling your name, you can discover benefits of prioritizing your own work and applying yourself in silence. Solitude will make you more at home with yourself than ever before as you explore your own answers.

Be About the Business with a Publisher’s Support

10. Learning to budget your author-preneurial business will grant you control and creative ideas to succeed (accounting aids, profit & loss statements, sales taxes, laws related to book events, copyright, and royalties).

ONE TO GROW ON…

Alternate Universe Hopping

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11. Enjoying Cafés… and coffee… and internet classrooms.

If any of these pro’s outweigh the con’s, I recommend that you set up a savings account in order to publish and start marketing not only your first book but also, your second.
Budget to eat less, and forego shopping sprees or vacations, in order to finish your series.

Things were not as expected.

You might be familiar with the wisdom that advises entrepreneurs to count the cost before building a house. But, for me, counting the costs of building a publishing house was not an option. That is, there was no trail of breadcrumbs through the forest leading toward the publishing house budget choices that would be most valuable. Instead, wild experimental line items which should not, could not, but did pop up anyway, added to my initial budget in uncategorized line items until I began to gain understanding. The entire world of hybrid group publishing was new. Somewhere after the second year, I threw a tantrum. Then, I learned that just because things were not as I expected, didn’t mean that I didn’t have the beginning of a platform and some new tools to use. From there, the thing began to move like gold nuggets from the mines in carts. I started to feed these nuggets to authors I’m coaching in a Facebook group called Golden Writers Conferences.


6 PRACTICAL THINGS TO EMPLOY FOR AUTHOR EARNINGS

I learned many things in a backward manner and spent time and money that I now see to be the price of personal education. Now, things are clearer. I know that authors, similar to athletes, actors, and politicians,  make money by a variety of means building up to the publishing of their first book and, of course, after it is launched! 

  1. Learn to blog for content marketing. Authors can gather their readers like chicks when they learn to blog. Maybe the experience of blogging becomes the subject for a new book, but maybe the experience of writing the book creates a new expression and following in blogging. Either way, the practice of blogging is the practice of being honest and relevant. It is the guts of content marketing for an author. You can start by posting and commenting about topics of interest to you on Facebook.  Then, expand the topic as you learn more about it, and create an essay or an article. Sign up for a blog and after editing your first foray into blog-land, ask people to take a look and give you comments.
  2. Getting speaking gigs at festivals, local libraries, holiday events, places of worship, study groups, schools, and book clubs–really anywhere people gather–will not only sell your stash of books, but will help you become a better communicator.
  3. Get your name, email, and phone number out there on business cards or flyers and take them to the venues you are most interested in. Get their card and give them yours.  Add them to your email and shipping or mailing lists and just ask around.
  4. Branching out to share what you know FREELY on live Zoom chats, Facebook Live, LinkedIn posts, podcasting networks, book tours, conferences, or simply by sending Mailchimp emails–by providing a “book me” link for people looking for presenters or facilitators who like your approach is the key to new streams of income.
  5. Hire a college kid to get your name, email, and phone number out there and just ask around. Have them teach you Instagram or Pinterest tricks.
  6. Form a private group of authors or a street team to help you cross-promote.  Generate that matrix of alliances and interests to naturally ignite interest between groups of followers and fans. Stop panicking and start sharing resources and interests.

Different things make different people tick.  Consider the money that people spend on shopping, fashion, child care, workout equipment and reps, television, stage performance, animals, industry or career. All of these are things that consume one’s budget, time, and effort.  They bring their own social circles into your life. Maybe it is worth writing your manuscript and getting your book into print simply to engage in the life you’ve always wanted to live.

If publishing your work is the thing that makes your clock tick, either use the other areas of your life as props, ideas, and research for your book or else begin to reclaim the amount of your own space in those areas of life, prioritizing inside them and siphoning off information from inside that priority towards your writing goals.

Tonya Jewel Blessing, a five-year author with Capture Books (Soothing Rain and her Big Creek Appalachian series ie., The Whispering of the Willows and The Melody of the Mulberries), reported at the end of her second year of writing,

“I think that passion is a huge piece of writing.  I have a passion (a strong and barely controllable feeling) about writing. I like creating a story. I like how writing brings things out in me that I didn’t even know existed. And, I am happy with the responses from readers I’ve had in this past year.”

Now, after trying many different author hacks, Tonya became Capture Books’ best selling author in her fourth year and decided to publish a sequel with them. Why not use the “author life” as a worthy and reasonable goal for your life? 

Do the psychological shuffling, get a coach, even if no-one else understands you.

Talk about the joys and frustrations you have with reading, writing, and arithmetic to your friends and associates.  Out with it!

When all of this begins happening, and your initial choices begin to snowball into life priorities, you may find yourself in a sardonic mood from time to time.  Will you wrestle with the necessary line items in your household budget to create new income streams with your writing or just give up? Not everyone has a difficult budget, but many creatives and writers do. Especially in the first five years.

If you are willing to endure set-backs and face your fears with coaching and education, you can have a fulfilling author-preneurial second career.

It may be an option to get financial counseling specifically related to your personal author’s line-item budget. Imagine creating the career you want step by step, with small strategic investments, and add coursework to learn the new business. Make lists. Move through them. revisit them for practice.

There are secrets to be learned. These are treasures to be employed and practiced in order to build a platform where you can champion your style, your cause, and stretch your wings. When a breeze comes your way, you’ll be ready.

If a writer continues to kick back on personal or professional development, I soon learn that that author really just wants to fall back to being just a writer.  And, that’s okay. But, an author must realize that this path is a full-time hobby at the very least, and is a significant investment into the future, and a learning curve into self-discovery and articulation.

GROW A DYNAMIC AUTHOR’S TOOLKIT AND KEEP EXPANDING YOUR REACH

Let your creative juices flow into marketing, learning, sharing resources, and practicing new things as similar juices flow in drafting a manuscript. “Star” or “bookmark” this post so that you can go back and follow EACH of the links and explore them or share them. in this way, you’ll expand DYNAMICALLY.

It’s tempting to capitulate into the pool of guilt and feelings of helplessness when budgeting funds towards the costs of launching an author-preneurial business. Don’t do this.  You will need to trust the Lord, while investing and creating new boundaries for yourself in order to succeed.  This is how anyone in business approaches future success.

Take Away: Use your ingenuity. You are a creative.  You are an author. So, when an advertising budget goes awry or the book expo leaves you saddled with debt, then pull out your list of why’s and add to this the list of “how’s this going to improve next time?”.


Managing Partner at Capture Books, (author of Welcome to the Shivoo! Creatives Mimicking the Creator). She is available to give this presentation in writer’s groups and to field questions in person or over the airwaves, or online. Contact her: lb.capturebooks@aol.com